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    Vaccines Required by Your Pet Care Facility  

Vaccines provide protection from a variety of diseases so your pet neither gets nor gives the infection. Most pet care facilities will require Distemper and Rabies vaccines for dogs and cats. In addition, Bordetella is often required for dogs and sometimes Leukemia for cats.

Here's a look at the components of vaccines. Many vaccine protocols are now beginning to change. You should speak with your veterinarian about each disease and yearly vaccinations.

Canine Distemper
This is really a composite of several diseases. Depending on the combination your vet uses, it may include some or all of the following: Distemper, Canine Hepatitis, Leptospirosis, Parainfluenza, Parvo virus and Corona virus.

This adds additional protection against coughing viruses and is boostered every six months to one year.

Feline Distemper
This is also a composite, containing mostly upper respiratory diseases (Panleukopenia, Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis, Calici Pnuemonitis), since that is what cats are most susceptible to.

Other Cat Vaccines
These include Feline Leukemia and Feline Infectious Peritonitis. Your veterinarian can tell you if your cat will need these additional vaccines.

Puppy and Kitten Boosters
Puppies and kittens receive several vaccines over a period of weeks when they are young. This is to protect them as their mother's immunity slowly wears away. Traditionally, dogs and cats receive boosters on a yearly basis following the initial series.

This vaccination for pets is required by law. It is usually given at between four and six months of age and then boostered. Depending on state law, boosters may be yearly, every other year or every three years.

Most reputable pet care facilities require proof of vaccination before your pet can board or be admitted into daycare. This is not only for the protection of your pet but for the protection of other pets in the facility’s care. Without adequate vaccinations, the facility may not accept your pet.

The content of this article is provided for informational purposes only. You should always consult your veterinarian with concerns about the care of your pet or for medical advice.

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